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Extending Your Home

If you are proposing to extend or carry out work to a house which is a family home please follow the links below for further information and advice.

There are also a number of easy to use interactive guides on the Planning Portal website, which provide comprehensive information for householders, and you can check a list of common building projects to see if the works you are considering will need permission. You can also explore an interactive semi-detached house for advice on common householder projects, and an interactive terrace for advice on terraced houses, flats, shops and basements and a set of mini guides for common projects.

Disclaimer
Please note: We have provided this information to assist our customers. This is without any representation or endorsement made and without warranty of any kind whether express or implied, including but not limited to the implied warranties of satisfactory quality, fitness for a particular purpose, non-infringement, compatibility, security and accuracy.

Extensions, Alterations and Additions Attached to the Dwelling Including Conservatories, Garages, Carports, Sheds, Windows Etc.

Complete Self Assessment Form A

You Need to Apply for Planning Permission to Extend or Add to Your House in the Following Circumstances:

Development is permitted subject to :

  • The use of matching external materials;
  • Any upper floor windows being obscure glazed and non-opening (unless the opening parts of the window are more than 1.7 metres above floor level);
  • Any extension with more than one storey having a roof pitch that, so far as practicable, matches the original house.

External materials sketch

Links to further information on external websites
Side extensions
Two storey and first floor extensions
Conservatory and rear single storey extensions
Converting a garage
Decking and Raised Platforms

You should check that there are no restrictive conditions on any planning decision relating to the property.
Please follow this link to our website where you can use our interactive mapping to check planning history, if “Permitted Development Rights” have been removed or if your property is in a Conservation Area or is a Listed Building. If your house is a Listed Building then Listed Building Consent is likely to be required even if planning permission is not necessary.

To view the legislation please follow this link to The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (Amendment) (No. 2) (England) Order 2008 (Refer to Class A)

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Chimneys, Flues, Soil and Vent Pipes

Complete Self Assessment Form E

You need to apply for planning permission if the chimney, flue or soil and vent pipe would exceed the highest part of the roof by 1 metre or more. If you live in a Conservation Area you will also need to apply for permission if the proposal would be installed on a wall or roof slope that fronts a highway and is either the principal or a side elevation of the house.

You should check that there are no restrictive conditions on any planning decision relating to the property.
Please follow this link to our website where you can use our interactive mapping to check planning history, if “Permitted Development Rights” have been removed or if your property is in a Conservation Area or is a Listed Building. If your house is a Listed Building then Listed Building Consent is likely to be required even if planning permission is not necessary.

To view the legislation please follow this link to The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (Amendment) (No. 2) (England) Order 2008 (Refer to Class G)

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Cladding

Complete Self Assessment Form A


If you live in a Conservation Area, you will need to apply for planning permission before cladding the outside of your house with stone, tiles, artificial stone, plastic, timber, render or pebble dash.

You should check that there are no restrictive conditions on any planning decision relating to the property.
Please follow this link to our website where you can use our interactive mapping to check planning history, if “Permitted Development Rights” have been removed or if your property is in a Conservation Area or is a Listed Building. If your house is a Listed Building then Listed Building Consent is likely to be required even if planning permission is not necessary.

To view the legislation please follow this link to The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (Amendment) (No. 2) (England) Order 2008 (Refer to Class A)

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Listed Buildings / Conservation Areas

The protection for listed buildings extends to cover any buildings or structures within the curtilage of the principal building. Please contact our Conservation Team for more information on 01509 634971 or Email: built.heritage@charnwood.gov.uk who will be able to assist you and give advice. Alternatively you can find further information on our website Listed Building and Conservation Areas.

You must apply for Listed Building consent if:

  • You want to knock down all or part of a Listed Building;
  • You want to alter or extend a Listed Building in a way that would affect its character.
  • NB Alterations to the INTERIOR of a listed building are covered by this type of consent.

You must apply for Conservation Area consent if:

  • You want to knock down a building (depending on its size), or wall or other means of enclosure that isn't Listed, but is in a Conservation Area and would have required planning permission to construct.

You should check that there are no restrictive conditions on any planning decision relating to the property.
Please follow this link to our website where you can use our interactive mapping to check planning history, if “Permitted Development Rights” have been removed or if your property is in a Conservation Area or is a Listed Building. If your house is a Listed Building then Listed Building Consent is likely to be required even if planning permission is not necessary

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Converting Your Garage

Planning permission is not usually required, providing the work is internal and does not involve enlarging the building.

You should check that there are no restrictive conditions on any planning decision relating to the property.
Please follow this link to our website where you can use our interactive mapping to check planning history, if “Permitted Development Rights” have been removed or if your property is in a Conservation Area or is a Listed Building. If your house is a Listed Building then Listed Building Consent is likely to be required even if planning permission is not necessary.

Links to further information on external websites

Converting a garage

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Building a Porch on an External Door of a House.

Complete a Self Assessment Form C

Planning Portal guide to building a  porch.

First assess if:-

  • The ground area (measured externally) is less than 3 square metres;
  • The porch would be less than 3 metres above ground level;
  • It would be more than 2 metres away from a road, footpath, bridleway or byway.

If your porch comes within these parameters then planning permission is not required.

If your porch exceeds these parameters then your proposal is classed as an extension and you should complete the Planning Permission for Extensions Form A to determine whether planning permission is required.

Follow this link to a sketch showing a porch.

Links to further information on an external website.
Building a porch

You should check that there are no restrictive conditions on any planning decision relating to the property.
Please follow this link to our website where you can use our interactive mapping to check planning history, if “Permitted Development Rights” have been removed or if your property is in a Conservation Area or is a Listed Building. If your house is a Listed Building then Listed Building Consent is likely to be required even if planning permission is not necessary

To view the legislation please follow this link to The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (Amendment) (No. 2) (England) Order 2008 (Refer to Class D)

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Additions or Alterations to the Roof

Complete Self Assessment Form D

Planning Portal guide to loft conversions.

You will need to apply for planning permission if:

  • You live in a Conservation Area and you wish to extend the roof;
  • The new works go higher than the existing roof;
  • The works would involve a roof extension on a roof slope facing a highway, including a public path;
  • The dormer window(s) or roof extensions, plus any previous extensions to the roof, would increase the size of the house by more than 40 cubic metres for a terraced house or 50 cubic metres for any other house;
  • It would consist of or include the construction of a veranda, balcony or raised platform (above 300mm high);

Development is permitted subject to :

  • The use of matching external materials;
  • The edge of the eaves of the extension shall, so far as practicable, be more than 20cm from the eaves of the original roof (except for hip-to-gable extensions)
  • Any window or roof light inserted on a side wall or side roof slope being obscure glazed and non-opening (unless the opening parts of the window are more than 1.7 metres above floor level).

Work on a loft or a roof may affect bats. You need to consider protected species when planning work of this type. A survey may be needed, and if bats are using the building, a licence may be required.

* Contact Natural England for more advice.

Links to a visual walk-through on the limits and conditions on the Planning Portal and sketch details for Loft Conversions on and external website.

You should check that there are no restrictive conditions on any planning decision relating to the property.
Please follow this link to our website where you can use our interactive mapping to check planning history, if “Permitted Development Rights” have been removed or if your property is in a Conservation Area or is a Listed Building. If your house is a Listed Building then Listed Building Consent is likely to be required even if planning permission is not necessary.

To view the legislation please follow this link to The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (Amendment) (No. 2) (England) Order 2008 (Refer to Classes B & C)

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Solar Equipment    New Legislation December 2011

Town & Country Planning (General Permitted Development) Order 1995 (as amended) Schedule 2 Part 40

Wind Turbines installed on your house on in the grounds  New Legislation December 2011

Town & Country Planning (General Permitted Development) Order 1995 (as amended) Schedule 2 Part 40

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Satellite Dishes

Normal domestic TV and radio aerials do not need planning permission. However, in certain circumstances, you will need to apply for planning permission to install a satellite dish or antenna on your house.

We do not currently have a Self Assessment form for Satellite dishes.

Is a Planning Application Required?

The rules for satellite dishes and antenna were amended on 25 November 2005. Although the below information includes these alterations, more information on the changes to the rules is available on the Department for Communities and Local Government website. For more information regarding the positioning of satellite dishes the Planning Portal website provides an easy to use walkthrough guide regarding whether planning permission is required, together with advice regarding the best location for such a dish (Macromedia Flash 5 is required to use the locator).

Listed Buildings

Some buildings are 'listed' because of their special or architectural interest. If your house is a Listed Building and you want to install an antenna on that building, you will generally need to apply for Listed Building Consent. Listed Building Consent is required for any antenna that affects the character or appearance of a Listed Building or its setting.

1) Houses and Buildings Up to 15 Metres High.

Unless your house (or the building in which you live) is in a designated area (i.e. Conservation Area), you do not need to apply for planning permission to install an antenna on your property, as long as:

  • there will be no more than two antennas on the property overall;
  • if you are installing a single antenna, it is not more than 100 cm in any linear dimension (not including any projecting feed element, reinforcing rim, mounting and brackets);
  • if you are installing two antennas, one is not more than 100 cm in any linear dimension, and the other is not more than 60 cm in any linear dimension (not including any projecting feed element, reinforcing rim, mounting and brackets);
  • the cubic capacity of each individual antenna is not more than 35 litres;
  • an antenna fitted onto a chimney stack is not more than 60 cm in any linear dimension; and
  • an antenna mounted on the roof only sticks out above the roof when there is a chimney-stack. In this case, the antenna should not stick out more than 60 cm above the highest part of the roof, or above the highest part of the chimney stack, whichever is lower.

In the case of a house (or the building in which you live) being located in a designated area (Conservation Area) you do not need to apply for planning permission to install an antenna on your property, as long as the above is met and:

  • an antenna is not installed on a chimney, wall, or roof slope which faces onto, and is visible from, a road or a Broads waterway.

2) Buildings 15 Metres or More in Height.

Unless your building is in a designated area (i.e. Conservation Area), you do not need to apply for planning permission to install an antenna on your property, as long as:

  • there will be no more than four antennas on the property overall;
  • the size of any antenna is not more than 130 cm in any linear dimension (not including any projecting feed element, reinforcing rim, mounting and brackets);
  • the cubic capacity of each individual antenna is not more than 35 litres;
  • an antenna fitted onto a chimney stack is not more than 60 cm in any linear dimension; and
  • an antenna mounted on the roof does not stick out above the roof more than 300 cm above the highest part of the roof.

In the case of a building being located in a designated area (Conservation Area) you do not need to apply for planning permission to install an antenna on your property, as long as the above is met and:

  • an antenna is not installed on a chimney, wall, or roof slope which faces onto, and is visible from, a road or a Broads waterway.

Definitions:

  • Linear dimension: This means taking the measurement in a straight line, starting from the edge of the antenna to the opposite edge of the antenna. The measurement should only include the antenna itself and not any attachment needed to fix it to the wall or roof, or connect it up to your equipment.

Projecting feed element: In a dish antenna, the incoming signals are received by the dish which then 'reflects' the signal into a central 'feed horn'. This

  • is usually positioned at a short distance (a few inches) away from the dish and held in place by projecting arm or arms.
  • Cubic capacity: This means the volume (the amount in three dimensions) occupied by an object using known method of measurement.

You should check that there are no restrictive conditions on any planning decision relating to the property.
Please follow this link to our website where you can use our interactive mapping to check planning history, if “Permitted Development Rights” have been removed or if your property is in a Conservation Area or is a Listed Building. If your house is a Listed Building then Listed Building Consent is likely to be required even if planning permission is not necessary

Please follow this link to the legislation on antennas

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Internal Alterations

Internal alterations do not require planning permission as they are not classed as development. This therefore means that permission is only usually required under the Building Regulations unless it is a Listed Building

External link to Internal Work

You should check that there are no restrictive conditions on any planning decision relating to the property.
Please follow this link to our website where you can use our interactive mapping to check planning history, if “Permitted Development Rights” have been removed or if your property is a Listed Building. If your house is a Listed Building then Listed Building Consent is likely to be required even if planning permission is not necessary

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Windows

Download a Self Assessment Form A

If the window projects beyond an existing wall (such as a bay window), this is treated as an extension and is subject to the same restrictions as Extensions and Additions. If the window you want to insert is an upper-floor window in the side elevation of the house then it must be obscure glazed and non-opening (unless the opening parts of the window are more than 1.7 metres above floor level). Refer to Roof Extensions if you want to create a dormer window or inset a window in the roof.

You should check that there are no restrictive conditions on any planning decision relating to the property.
Please follow this link to our website where you can use our interactive mapping to check planning history, if “Permitted Development Rights” have been removed or if your property is in a Conservation Area or is a Listed Building. If your house is a Listed Building then Listed Building Consent is likely to be required even if planning permission is not necessary.

To view the legislation please follow this link to The Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (Amendment) (No. 2) (England) Order 2008 (Refer to Class A)

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Maintenance

You do not need to apply for planning permission:

  • For repairs or maintenance, including minor improvements, such as painting your house or replacing windows;
  • For internal alterations;
  • To re-roof your house (however additions to the roof are treated as roof extensions).

You should check that there are no restrictive conditions on any planning decision relating to the property.
Please follow this link to our website where you can use our interactive mapping to check planning history, if “Permitted Development Rights” have been removed or if your property is in a Conservation Area or is a Listed Building. If your house is a Listed Building then Listed Building Consent is likely to be required even if planning permission is not necessary

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More Information

If you require a formal decision as to whether a use or development, proposed or existing is lawful then you should submit an application for a certificate of Lawful Development. (fee £75.00) Further guidance is available Lawful Development Certificates - A User's Guide from Communities and Local Government and an application can be submitted on-line through the Planning Portal (click on the logo below). downloadable forms are also available to complete

Please follow this link for more information regarding how to submit planning applications.

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The term ‘highway’ includes public roads, footpaths, bridleways and byways.

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Informal Views From Communities And Local Government
Definition of principal elevation.

There is no definition of principal elevation in the legislation (GPDO).

It would have been extremely difficult to come up with a definition that provided absolute certainty as to what the principal elevation was in all circumstances.

However, we believe that in the vast majority of cases it would be perfectly clear what the principal elevation was ie. the part of the house that fronts the highway and which usually contains the main entrance.

In practice we accept that in a minority of cases there will have to be an assessment by the planning authority on a case by case basis as to what constitutes the principal elevation.

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Informal Views From Communities And Local Government
Use of materials of a similar appearance.

This condition seeks to ensure that the visual impact of an extension including a loft development is minimised by requiring that the materials used are "of a similar appearance".

The original Government proposals suggested that the condition should be in terms of materials matching the existing house. Having considered this further we decided that this could be unnecessarily onerous and changed the restriction in the legislation to provide more flexibility through a condition that required the appearance to be similar.

The intention is that by requiring this the development is sympathetic in appearance to what is already there and that the visual impact is minimised.

We are aware that in a number of local authority areas this condition is being interpreted in such a way that would mean, for example, that all flat-roofed dormer extensions, which typically have a felt or a fibreglass roof, would not be permitted development.

The department recognises that this condition allows some local interpretation. However, in our view this does not mean that the type of material used needs to be either the same or similar to the existing building. The roof need not therefore be covered by concrete tile or slate. The condition would require the appearance to be similar.

We believe that even where a different material is used it is possible that the condition could be met if, for example, a similar colour were used. While this might not always be acceptable, whether something was similar in appearance would, in our view, depend on a number of factors. We would expect that one of these factors would be the prominence or visibility of that part of the extension.

For example, the flat roof of a dormer at, or near, ridge height will often not be visible and we would hope local planning authorities would consider this aspect.

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Informal Views From Communities And Local Government

Does the extension need permission if it has any eaves higher than any eaves on the existing house?
The question arises in cases where there are eaves of various heights (e.g where the existing house is both single and two storeys). Also, should eaves over dormer windows be taken into consideration?

It is expected that the eaves height restriction would relate to the part of the dwelling/house being extended from ie if you had a building that was both one and two storeys and you were extending from the one storey part of it the eaves would have to be no higher than those of the one storey part of the house.

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Informal Views From Communities And Local Government

Is the principal elevation any elevation fronting a highway?
There are some houses that have more than one principal elevation, for example on corner plots and in terraces which have a highway both at the front and at the back.

Principal elevation is not defined in terms of it fronting a highway. It’s what most people would say is the main elevation at the front. Therefore just because an elevation fronts a highway it doesn’t mean it is a principal elevation.

The legislation (GPDO) refers to "the principal elevation" so the assumption is that there will be just one principal elevation. For most plots it should be possible to distinguish easily the principal elevation from a side elevation.

In some corner plots it may be that more than one elevation has the character of a principal elevation (perhaps where there is more than one entrance to the property) in which case both would be covered by any restriction on the principal elevation.

Some houses (e.g. on backland plots, on farms or in barn conversions) do not front any highway.
Does this mean that they have no principal elevation? In such cases does that mean there is no limit to how far they can be extended on a wall that is not a side or rear wall?

There could be a principal elevation that does not front a highway, but the question is largely academic given that the restrictions are in terms of a principal elevation that also fronts a highway.

Development to a principal elevation that does not front a highway would be subject to the eaves height limit and the overall 50% limit on development within the curtilage.

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Informal Views From Communities And Local Government.

Does the reference to extending beyond the rear wall mean any rear wall?
The issue arises in all cases where the rear of the house is not built as a single wall, but is cranked.

The relevant consideration here is the part of the wall that is being extended from.
Therefore where there is an original rear addition/outrigger there will be more than one original rear wall.

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Informal Views From Communities And Local Government.

Taken literally, “opposite” appears to refer to the dwelling/house that is opposite the rear wall of the dwelling/house being extended, but we think the meaning is that the 7 metres is measured from the rear wall to the boundary that it faces. Is this correct?

The 7 metre restriction is from the rear wall to the boundary it faces

What constitutes a rear boundary?
What about sites on wedge shaped or irregular shaped plots?
At what point would the boundary be rear?

There is no reference in the Order to a "rear boundary". The development is not permitted where the enlarged part would have more than one storey and be within 7 metres of "any boundary of the curtilage of the dwelling/house opposite the rear wall of the dwelling/house".

In the case of a triangular plot with the house at the base, development would not be permitted if it is within 7 metres of any of the sides of the triangle opposite the rear wall.

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Informal Views From Communities And Local Government.

If the original dwelling/house was of varying width, which width applies?

In our view, it would be the widest dimension that should be used.

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Informal Views From Communities And Local Government.

Is “the dwelling/house” here the existing house or the original house?

As we don’t refer to the original dwelling/house it should be taken to be the existing dwelling/house.

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Informal Views From Communities And Local Government

Soil vent pipes never previously been considered development and not required on drawings - PD is not now given where extensions include the alteration or installation of a soil vent pipe (in both Class A and B).

Given that 95% of all rear extensions include an alteration/addition of a soil vent pipe to comply with BRegs, pd has been taken away for vast majority of extensions (even those previously granted pd). Dismantling the existing pipe and passing it through the internal walls would still be an alteration open to challenge by a disgruntled neighbour.

Last updated: Thu 18th September, 2014 @ 12:42

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