This webpage is where residents in Charnwood can find up to date Government guidance about Covid-19 and any national restrictions that are in affect.

Plan B restrictions to be lifted in the coming weeks (January 19)

The government has announced that the measures put in place under Plan B in England will be lifted.

This means:

  • The government is no longer asking people to work from home if they can. People should now talk to their employers to agree arrangements to return to the office.
  • From 20 January: Face coverings will no longer be advised for staff and pupils in secondary school and college classrooms.
  • From 27 January: Face coverings will no longer be advised for staff and pupils in communal areas of secondary schools, nor for staff in communal areas of primaries. Directors of Public Health will only be able to recommend pupils and staff wear masks in communal areas in places where there are outbreaks or where the local public health situation justifies it, and with sign-off from the Education Secretary.
  • From 27 January: There is no longer a legal requirement to wear a face covering. The government suggests that you continue to wear a face covering in crowded and enclosed spaces where you may come into contact with other people you do not normally meet.
  • From 27 January: Venues and events will no longer be required by law to check visitors’ NHS COVID Pass. The NHS COVID Pass can still be used on a voluntary basis.

This guidance will be updated shortly to include more information on these changes. You should continue to follow all of the guidance on the Government website to keep yourself and others safe.

Self-isolation for those with Covid-19 can end after 5 full days following 2 negative LFD tests (January 14)

From Monday January 17, 2022, people with Covid-19 in England can end their self-isolation after 5 full days, as long as they test negative on day 5 and day 6.

Read the full announcement on the Government website

Confirmatory PCR tests to be temporarily suspended for positive lateral flow test results (Wednesday January 5)

The Government has confirmed that from Tuesday January 11, 2022 in England, people who receive positive lateral flow device (LFD) test results for Covid-19 will be required to self-isolate immediately and won’t be required to take a confirmatory PCR test.

The Government stated that this is a temporary measure while Covid-19 rates remain high across the UK. Whilst levels of Covid-19 are high, the vast majority of people with positive LFD results can be confident that they have Covid-19.

Read the full announcement on the Government website

Self-isolation period changes to 7 days (Wednesday December 22)

New self-isolation guidance was introduced to enable the 10-day self-isolation period for people who have tested positive for coronavirus to be reduced to 7 days in most cases.

People who receive negative LFD results on day 6 and day 7 of their self-isolation period – with tests taken 24 hours apart – will no longer have to self-isolate for the full 10 days. The first test must be taken no earlier than day 6 of the self-isolation period.

Those who leave self-isolation on or after day 7 are strongly advised to limit close contact with other people in crowded or poorly ventilated spaces, work from home and minimise contact with anyone who is at higher risk of severe illness if infected with Covid-19.

There is no change to the guidance for unvaccinated contacts of positive Covid-19 cases, who are still required to self-isolate for 10 full days after their date of exposure to the virus.

Read full details on Gov.uk

Government moves England into Plan B (Wednesday December 8)

The government has announced that England will move to Plan B in response to the risks of the Omicron variant.

This means:

  • From 10 December, face coverings will be required by law in most indoor settings.
  • From 13 December office workers who can work from home should do so.
  • From 15 December, certain venues and events will be required by law to check that all visitors aged 18 years or over are fully vaccinated, have proof of a negative test in the last 48 hours, or have an exemption.

More details on the Gov.uk website via the link below:

Government update on how to stay safe and prevent the spread of Covid-19

Guidance on face coverings

From 10 December, face coverings will be required by law in most indoor public places and on public transport, including taxis. See a full list of places where you must wear a face covering.

There are some exemptions. You do not have to wear a face covering in hospitality settings such as cafés, restaurants and pubs. This is because it is not practical to keep removing face coverings to eat or drink.

You do not need to wear a face covering in nightclubs or certain other night-time venues, including dance halls and discotheques. This is because it is not recommended that you wear a face covering while exercising or during strenuous physical activity, including dancing.

Settings which are exempt from wearing a face covering include:

  • Restaurants, cafés and canteens
  • Bars and shisha bars
  • Gyms & exercise facilities
  • Photography studios
  • Nightclubs, dance halls and discotheques

In indoor settings where a face covering is not legally required, you should still continue to wear a face covering in crowded and enclosed spaces where you may come into contact with other people you do not normally meet.

Work from home if you can

Office workers who can work from home should do so from Monday 13 December. Anyone who cannot work from home should continue to go into work - for example, to access equipment necessary for their role or where their role must be completed in person. In-person working will be necessary in some cases to continue the effective and accessible delivery of some public services and private industries. If you need to continue to go into work, consider taking lateral flow tests regularly to manage your own risk and the risk to others.

Employers should consider whether home working is appropriate for workers facing mental or physical health difficulties, or those with a particularly challenging home working environment.

For those who attend their workplace, the Government will continue to provide up-to-date Working Safely guidance on how employers can reduce the risks in their workplace. Businesses should consider this guidance when preparing their health and safety risk assessments, and put in place suitable mitigations.

Required use of the NHS COVID Pass

From 15 December, certain venues and events will be required by law to check that all visitors aged 18 years or over are fully vaccinated (currently a full course of vaccination without the need for a booster, but this will be kept under review), have proof of a negative test in the last 48 hours, or that they have an exemption. This means that those aged 18 years or over must show their NHS COVID Pass, or an alternative proof of a negative test result, such as an email or text proof, to gain entry into these venues.

You can access your NHS COVID Pass through:

  • the NHS App
  • NHS.UK
  • A letter that you can obtain on NHS.UK or by calling 119

The NHS COVID Pass lets you share your COVID vaccination status and test results in a secure way for entry to domestic venues or events.

You can obtain an NHS COVID Pass two weeks after completing a full course of vaccination or with a negative test in the last 48 hours. The NHS COVID Pass can be obtained with two doses (or one of the single-dose Janssen vaccine), but we will keep this under review as boosters are rolled out. You can also obtain an NHS COVID Pass if:

  • you have received a trial vaccine as part of a formally approved COVID-19 vaccine trial in the UK
  • you have a medical reason that means you cannot be vaccinated, confirmed by your GP or a specialist clinician

You can also show email or text proof of your negative test result in order to gain entry to these venues.

The use of the NHS COVID Pass is required as a condition of entry into the following places:

  • nightclubs, dancehalls and discotheques;
  • other late night dance venues. These are any other venues that are:
    • open between 1am and 5am;
    • serve alcohol during this time;
    • have a dancefloor (or designated space for dancing); and
    • provide music, whether live or recorded, for dancing.
  • indoor events with 500 or more unseated attendees, where those attendees are likely to stand or move around for all or part of the event, such as music venues with standing audiences or large receptions;
  • outdoor events with 4,000 or more unseated attendees, where those attendees are likely to stand or move around for all or part of the event, such as outdoor festivals; and
  • any events with 10,000 or more attendees indoor or outdoor, such as large sports and music events

There are some settings that will be exempt from requirements to use the NHS COVID Pass including communal worship, wedding ceremonies, funerals and other commemorative events, protests, and mass participation sporting events.

Keeping yourself and others safe

There are still cases of Covid-19 in England and there is a risk you could catch or pass on the virus, even if you are fully vaccinated. You are encouraged to exercise caution and consider the risks. While no situation is risk free, there are actions we can take to protect ourselves and others around us.

If you are worried about going back to a more ‘normal’ life, there is information from the NHS on how to cope with anxiety about lockdown lifting.

Read the full guidance on the Government website

Covid-19 Response - Autumn and Winter 2021 (Full document)

Please note: This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology, e.g. screen readers. If you use assistive technology and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email publiccorrespondence@cabinetoffice.gov.uk and request a copy in the format and technology you need.

Last updated: Wed 19th January, 2022 @ 16:05