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Types of election

To take part in the elections listed on this page, you must first be both eligible and registered to vote.


Borough & Parish Council Elections -
These are held once every four years, on the first Thursday of May.

  • Charnwood Borough is made up of 28 Wards each having one, two or three councillors depending on its size.  There are a total of 52 seats.


County Council Elections -
These are held once every four years, on the first Thursday in May.  The last elections were held on the 2 May 2013.  The next election will be held on May 4, 2017.

  • Charnwood has 14 divisions for the County Council each represented by 1 councillor.


By-Elections -
A by-election is held to fill a political office vacancy that becomes available between regularly scheduled elections. This is usually due to the death or resignation of the person holding the office in question


European Parliamentary Elections -
These are held every five years. The last European Elections took place on 22 May 2014.  The next will be held in 2019.

  • EU citizens living in the UK need to register to vote and then complete and return the European Parliament voter registration form (UC1) which will be sent out to you four months prior to the election. If you do not complete and return this form, you will not be able to vote.


Parliamentary Elections -
These are held in response to the end of a Parliament. An election must be held in the UK, and a new Parliament elected, every five years. Charnwood is split between two Parliamentary constituencies, Charnwood & Loughborough. 

  • Citizens of the European Union (who are not Commonwealth citizens or Citizens of the Republic of Ireland) are not able to vote in UK Parliamentary general elections.
  • Visit www.parliament.uk/ for information about the role of MPs and the work of parliament.


Police and Crime Commissioner Elections -
These are held every four years. The next election is due to be held in May 2016.


Referendum -
A referendum is a general vote by the electorate on a single political question, which has been referred to them for a direct decision.

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