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The Homestead, 65 Swithland Lane, Rothley (Grade II)

Geo: 52.7105, -1.1609
Date ListedFri 12th October, 1984
CategoryStatutory Listed Building
AddressNo. 65 (The Homestead) Swithland Lane Rothley LE7 7SG
GradeGrade II
Grid ReferenceSK5678612867
LBS405221
Volume, Map, Item260, 6, 118
ParishRothley
WardMountsorrel
Conservation AreaRothley Ridgeway
DescriptionHouse, C18 with modifications c1920. Modification possibly by G E Clare. Red brick and Swithland slate roof with brick end and rear stacks. Brick dentilled eaves cornice. Two ranges , main range to left. Three storeys of leaded light casements: 3 light, 2 light, 3 light with cambered lintels. Three 2 lights on 2nd floor, the central taller and projecting above eaves level. On ground floor a one storey flat roofed projection c1920 with patterned lead band to edge of roof. On front to left a 5 light bow, central recessed porch with overlight and 4 light to right. Range to right probably raised � storey c1920. Two storeys of two 3 light leaded casements with top lights. Below a door (probably C18) and overlight within rounded arch and 3 light and 1 light to right. Casements and French window on left end. Inside are brick vaulted cellars, chamfered ceiling beams, c4�m wide inglenook in former kitchen, though hood gone, staircase probably C18 in part, oak panelling c1920, and in the entrance hall a plasterwork frieze c2/3m high of c1920 depicting figures in Roman dress and farm animals. This house was formerly Rothley Plain Farm and was part of the Rothley Temple estate, which at the beginning of C20, was developed as Rothley Garden Suburb. The resident architect was George E Clare, M.S.A., who probably altered the house and most of the adjoining outbuildings (now Nos. 57-63 Swithland Lane (q.v.). These buildings form an interesting group both architecturally and historically. Rothley Garden Suburb, a brief description, Rothley 1909.

The description above describes the salient features of the building as it was at the date of listing. It is given in order to aid identification; it is not intended to be either comprehensive or exclusive.

Statutory Listing covers all parts of the property and its curtilage, ie all internal and external elements whether described or not.

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