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Chapel and Ruins of Mansion, Bradgate Park, Newtown Linford (Grade II*)

Geo: 52.6866, -1.2111
Date ListedWed 1st June, 1966
CategoryStatutory Listed Building
AddressChapel and Ruins of Mansion Bradgate Park Newtown Linford LE12 7AF
GradeGrade II*
Grid ReferenceSK5342610174
LBS189075
Volume, Map, Item286, 3, 24
ParishNewtown Linford
WardForest Bradgate
DescriptionChapel and ruins of mansion begun c1490. Diapered red brick with stone dressings. Chapel has brick plinth with stone moulding, moulded stone band, brick dentilled eaves and renewed Swithland slate roof, gable facing. In gable end a large 6x4 leaded light mullion and transom window with hoodmould. Two blocked windows left side. Inside two arched cross beams, bricked floor, 1719 slate floor slab, and fine alabaster tomb, possibly restored, of Henry Baron Grey of Groby, d 1614 and his wife Ann. Recumbent effigies. Tomb chest in recess, flanked by columns and carrying an entablature with achievement and supporters. Strapwork decoration. Surrounding chapel the mansion ruins with four towers, one square, three polygonal and three remaining to two storey height. One wall of Great Hall remains with stone moulded frames of large windows. Mansion begun and mostly built by Thomas Grey, 1st Marquis of Dorset, great grandfather of Lady Jane Grey, whose childhood home this was. In 1547 Sir William Cavendish and Bess of Hardwick married in chapel. The park setting is a very impressive example of the ancient form of deer park with hills, gnarled and knotted trees and a stream running through its valley centre. Scheduled ancient monument. Plan in Forsyth, M., The History of Bradgate, Bradgate Park Trust, Leicester, 1974.

The description above describes the salient features of the building as it was at the date of listing. It is given in order to aid identification; it is not intended to be either comprehensive or exclusive.

Statutory Listing covers all parts of the property and its curtilage, ie all internal and external elements whether described or not.

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