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Tree preservation and hedges

Works to trees and hedgerows may require planning permission. If a tree is protected by a Tree Preservation Order (TPO), or is situated in a designated conservation area, in most cases you will need to obtain written consent from us before carrying out any works to it. Carrying out of work without consent is an offence and may lead to a fine of up to £20,000.

You can find out whether your tree has a TPO or is within a conservation area by checking the Property Notices section of the Local Information page on My Charnwood, or alternatively you can view via our Interactive Maps system. If so, please contact us on:


Tree Preservation Orders (TPO)

A Tree Preservation Order is a legal order which prevents certain trees from being cut down, uprooted, topped/lopped or purposefully damaged without our permission. We do this to protect trees which may visually enhance the quality of the borough's environment or trees which are a benefit to the community.

Other factors such as the importance of a site as a wildlife habitat may be taken into consideration which alone would not be sufficient to justify a TPO.

If you think that there are trees in need of protection please contact us and give details of the tree(s) and the reasons why you think the tree(s) should be protected. We will then assess the amenity value and can make a TPO where appropriate.


Trees in conservation areas

By law, anyone planning to cut down or carry out work to a tree in a conservation area must give us six weeks written notice of their intention to do so. The notice must describe all plans and include enough information to allow us to identify the tree/s.

Tree owners should first consider discussing their ideas with an arboriculturalist or our Landscape Officer.


Trees covered by planning condition

When planning permission is granted on land containing trees, it is usual for a condition to be imposed to safeguard the trees. The existence of a TPO will not necessarily prevent development but we will consider the risk to protected trees when deciding planning applications.

Once a detailed planning permission has been granted, any felling may be carried out which is directly required to enable the development to go ahead.


Woodlands

Removing trees within a woodland may require a felling license, under the Forestry Act 1967. To find out if you may need a felling license, visit the Forestry Commission's webpage.  

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